Celebrating International Women’s Day

To celebrate International Women’s Day, we selected four Bicycle Quarterly covers that show extraordinary women cyclists. Clockwise from top left: Paulette Porthault cycled all over Europe during the 1930s, won the Poly de Chanteloup hillclimb race during the war (using the form she had gained from smuggling food into occupied Paris to support herself, her relatives and her friends). Lyli Herse was a legendary randonneuse before picking up road racing and winning eight French championships. Jacquie Phelan won the first three NORBA mountain bike championships and founded the WOMBATS (Women’s Mountain Bike and Tea Society). Our editor Natsuko Hirose has championed the cause of women cyclists breaking free of stereotypes altogether. And below is a sneak preview of our (still top secret) Spring edition, which contains more stories by inspirational women cyclists.

3 Responses to Celebrating International Women’s Day

  1. Preston Grant March 10, 2020 at 3:46 pm #

    It is wonderful to see this tribute to women cyclists. I would like to mention one of the greatest women racers, Beryl Burton, of the U.K., who set many time trial records during the 1960’s. I should also like to pay tribute to my wife, Janet, who told me in 2010, at age 56, that the next year she wanted to ride her own bike in the Pyrenees. She was my tandem stoker, and we are quite sure that in her entire life, she had not
    cycled so much as 100 miles on her own bike. I told her to forget it, that it was impossible, so she responded “Yeah, I’ll show you”, and the next year she did. This coming June, Janet at age 65 is going to attempt a Raid Pyrenean. Shows what I know.

  2. Hayden Cameron March 10, 2020 at 6:01 pm #

    I guess the next step is allowing a woman to write a post on international woman’s day…..

    • Natsuko March 10, 2020 at 9:17 pm #

      As (female) BQ editor, I always welcome and enjoy publishing articles by female cyclists. In fact, the upcoming BQ71 has several articles from female perspectives. Of course, there still aren’t so many female cyclist, compared to male cyclists. So I think that it is normal when you read the magazine or blog post, to feel that most of all articles are written by male cyclists. But that is not entirely true. Female voices aren’t always so loud, but we have very strong opinions. Hopefully everybody will notice things are changing.

      Thank you!